(to be) at each other's throats




Idiom Definition

Idiom Definition - at each other's throats

"(to be) at each other's throats"

to be vehemently fighting or arguing

 

Related words and phrases:



Idiom Scenario 1

Idiom Definition - at each other's throats

Two colleagues are talking ...

Colleague 1:  What are they arguing about this time?

Colleague 2:  Who knows?  Probably the same fight they always have.

Colleague 1:  I don't know about that. They are at each other's throats this time.

Colleague 2:  Must be something really contentious.



Idiom Scenario 2

Idiom Definition - at each other's throats

Two friends are talking ...

Friend 1:  I think Jennifer and Stewart are going to break up soon.

Friend 2:  They have been arguing a lot lately.

Friend 1:  I hope they resolve their differences before they are at each other's throats.

Friend 2:  Yes. When people allow their fighting to reach that point, things are said in anger that are regretted later.




(to be) at each other's throats - Usage:

formal<---------------|----------X----->informal



Usage Frequency Index:   361   click for frequency by country





(to be) at each other's throats - Gerund Form:

Being at each other's throats all day, the couple finally ran out of vitriol.




(to be) at each other's throats - Examples:

1)  ... licensing payouts from manufacturers of Android devices have seen the two at each other's throats since at least 2010, when the folks from Redmond lodged an ITC complaint over ...

2)  ... my relationship with my wife and not wait until we are at each other's throats or worse yet in divorce court to work on my relationship and allow it to ...

3)  The city and the library have been at each other's throats for much of the last year -- through budget cuts and branch closures and threats ...

4)  ... it's no wonder that Apple and Samsung have been at each other's throats lately. They both know that there is more at stake than protecting patents or ...

5)  It's a real shame that everyone is at each other's throats on here, bashing each other's countries.

6)  ... nearly equal portions which hate each other and long to fly at each other's throats, that portion which is just less than half will not submit tamely to the ...

7)  When you hear the term Hobbesian, you think of people at each other's throats, struggling for power in a situation of chaos.

8)  ... showing how two individuals who were earlier virtually at each other's throats have now come to understand and respect one another far more.

9)  If Israel was to disappear tomorrow the Arabs would still be at each other's throats, and the world wouldn't be any safer from suicide bombers and terrorists.

10)  It harms our souls. We are at each other's throats on virtually every topic, half the time we don't even mean it, ...

11)  But instead of working together on this messaging, we're at each other's throats pointing fingers and declaring that one side is the problem.

12)  ... issues of the day are distractions -- something to keep us at each other's throats instead of paying attention to what's really happening.

13)  But why do the two schools always seem to be at each other's throats? Why are the two schools such fierce rivals?

14)  ... politics for what it does - divides us and sets us at each other's throats.

15)  ... my husband and I were almost at each other's throats. During the day our baby was witnessing our arguments.

16)  ... as the ship of state is sinking, the crew is at each other's throats, too busy fighting to plug the holes and pump out the water.

17)  We're all close to going at each other's throats. It will be interesting when the big fight finally kicks off.

18)  Microsoft and Apple have always been at each other's throats, so when they get into bed together you have to start wondering what's ...

19)  For these reasons, mages and non-mages are constantly at each other's throats -- mages resent their church-sanctioned imprisonment, and non-mages fear the mages' volatility and ...

20)  All three of us were at each other's throats constantly from pure exhaustion. I snapped at Harrison, something I very rarely do.