to go over someone's head



Idiom Definition

"to go over someone's head"

to take an issue or decision to someone who has more authority than your direct superior

Idiom Definition - to go over someone's head

 

Related words and phrases:



Idiom Scenario 1

Idiom Definition - to go over someone's head

Two workers are talking about a recurring production problem that the factory has been having for a long time.

Worker 1:  I see we still haven't fixed that problem yet.

Worker 2:  I know!  The fix is so easy.  We could have it repaired in a matter of hours.

Worker 1:  Let's do it, then.

Worker 2:  I've talked to the supervisor about fixing the problem at least five times.  The supervisor doesn't seem interested in fixing the problem.  Maybe I should go over his head and talk to the plant manager.

Worker 1:  You could do that but you will likely alienate the supervisor and you still have to work with him.

Worker 2:  True.  I guess I will have to think about it a little.



Idiom Scenario 2

Idiom Definition - to go over someone's head

Two students are talking about a recent poor grade that one of the students received.

Student 1:  I just can't believe the grade that Teaching Assistant gave me on my term paper!

Student 2:  You don't think it's fair?

Student 1:  Not at all!  I worked really hard on that paper and I know I covered the necessary material.

Student 2:  You should go over the TA's head and talk to your professor about it.

Student 1:  Ya, that's an option but if the professor agrees with the TA, I will be in trouble the next time the TA marks one of my papers.

Student 2:  True enough.  People don't like it when you go over their heads.





to go over someone's head - Usage:

formal<-------------X--|--------------->informal



to go over someone's head - Gerund Form:

Going over someone's head can produce negative results.



to go over someone's head - Examples:

1)  I go over the boss's head when I think that I am right.

2)  You go over the teacher's head when you disagree with their assessment.

3)  He goes over the Minister's head with matters of state security.

4)  She goes over the clerk's head and speaks to the store manager directly when she has a big complaint.

5)  We go over the assistant coach's head and talk to the head coach when a critical play is not working.

6)  You (all) go over the deacon's head and talk to the priest directly when you (all) are not happy with the deacon's advice.

7)  They go over the manager's head and talk to the director when there is a critical issue.

8)  Is he going over the boss's head right now?

9)  Has he gone over the boss's head a few times in the past?

10)  Have they been going over the boss's head since I started working here?

11)  Did you go over the assistant coach's head yesterday?

12)  Were you (all) going over the assistant coach's head when the game started?

13)  She had gone over the assistant coach's head by the time the game started.

14)  They had not been going over the assistant coach's head for most of the season before the assistant coach was fired.

15)  Will you go over the Sergeant's head next week if nothing is done about the situation?

16)  Do not go to HR or go over your boss's head. Not yet. First, meet with him in private.

17)  Two prime directives: First, never go over your boss's head without explicit permission. Second, never start a war with your boss.

18) They ask the boss politely; demand firmly; go over the boss's head, or maybe even threaten to resign, secure another job offer, or simply... 

19)  You (all) are not going to go over the Sergeant's head next week if nothing is done about the situation.

20)  Will they go over the Sergeant's head next week if nothing is done about the situation?