out of pocket




Idiom Definition 1

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

"out of pocket"

money that you have to spend yourself rather than having it paid for you, for example by your employer or insurance company

 

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Idiom Definition 2

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

"out of pocket"

to be unavailable, typically because one is away from one's phone or desk

 

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Idiom Definition 3

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

"out of pocket"

lacking money;

having suffered a financial loss

 

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Idiom Scenario 1

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

Two colleagues are talking ...

Colleague 1: Are you excited about your upcoming business trip?

Colleague 2: Sure, but I have to pay for everything out of pocket.

Colleague 1: Yes. You have to pay up front but the company reimburses you after the trip.

Colleague 2: But it can take up to two months once all the paperwork is filed.



Idiom Scenario 2

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

Two colleagues are talking ...

Colleague 1: Where's the boss? I really need some information in order to continue with my work.

Colleague 2: The boss is out of pocket at the moment.

Colleague 1: Not here again? Do we know when the boss will be in the office?

Colleague 2: The boss didn't inform anyone of his schedule.

Test Your Understanding  

Idiom Scenario 3

Idiom Definition - out of pocket

Two friends are talking ...

Friend 1: Let's go out for supper.

Friend 2: I can't. I'm out of pocket.

Friend 1: You have no money?

Friend 2: I am broke until payday.



out of pocket - Usage:

formal<-------------X(DEF1)--|-------------X(DEF2,3)-->informal



Usage Frequency Index:   3,670   click for frequency by country





out of pocket - Gerund Form:

There is no gerund form for out of pocket.




out of pocket - Examples:

1)  Deductible: The amount some plans require you to pay out of pocket before your insurance kicks in and covers other costs.

2)  The owner of the pool, Slush, is covering the losses out of pocket, so nobody is losing anything except him.

3)  It may be possible to pay for your degree out of pocket, however the cash really ought to be saved for a rainy day. 

4)  It'll be about $1,000 out of pocket and four months until you see anything that looks like an offer.

5)  ... which meant that "help" was out of pocket for years before her policy became effective.

6)  A morning roundup follows. I'm going to be out of pocket most of the day today. 

7)  ... when pretty much all department heads and knowers-of-things are out of pocket, first thing in the morning. It's killing my productivity ...

8)  If you end up paying for some of your graduate education out of pocket, be sure to take advantage of the penalty-free IRA.

9)  So you are really only out of pocket maybe $2000.

10)  ... buying her a BMW with cash and paying maternity bills out of pocket

11)  Were you offered a scholarship, or would you have to pay tuition out of pocket or take out a loan to study there?

12)  Direct non-health related costs included out of pocket expenses and costs for paid and unpaid help.

13)  The plaintiff had simply asked McDonalds to cover about $5,000 of out of pocket medical expenses which her insurance didn't cover. 

14)  They had two small children and paid all their medical bills out of pocket

15)  My medication normally would be $590. out of pocket. I paid $230 after the discount card was applied.

16)  There are obvious out-of-pocket cost savings by using group plans with in-network dental, medical and vision providers.

17)  Many of these tenants have lost income and incurred substantial out-of-pocket costs to provide for their families throughout this crisis. 

18)  ... a small scholarship for $200 a semester, Mr. Johnson was still responsible for $6,000 out-of-pocket each year. Mr. Johnson has paid his way through five semesters of schooling.

19)  Long-distance caregivers spend an average of $392/month on travel and out-of-pocket expenses as part of their care-giving duties.

20)  Women of reproductive age currently spend 68 percent more in out-of-pocket health care costs than men.